Previous Next

Double Disillusion

Contributors

Nicholas Barry is a Lecturer in Politics at La Trobe University. His main research interests are in Australian politics, political institutions and contemporary political theory.

Clive Bean is Professor of Political Science at Queensland University of Technology. He is a co-principal investigator of the Australian Election Study and author of numerous publications in national and international journals on electoral behaviour.

Damien Cahill is Associate Professor in Political Economy at the University of Sydney. His research focuses on neoliberalism as well as on the institutional foundations of capitalist economies.

Andrea Carson lectures in political science at the University of Melbourne and is an honorary fellow at the university’s Centre for Advancing Journalism. Andrea was a journalist at the Age (Fairfax Media) and worked in radio (ABC 774, 3RRR) television (ABC 7.30) and online (the Age, ABC).

Peter Chen works in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney.

Geoff Cockfield is Professor in Government and Economics at the University of Southern Queensland. His research foci include rural policy and politics and natural resources policy. He has co-edited and contributed to a book on the future of the National Party and written journal articles on the electoral performance of the party.

Jennifer Curtin is Professor of Politics at the University of Auckland. She writes entries on Australian elections for the European Political Science Data Yearbook, and is co-author of Rebels with a Cause: Independents in Australian Politics (2004) with Brian Costar, and author of The Voice and the Vote of the Bush: The Representation of Rural and Regional Australia in the Federal Parliament (2004).

Sara Dehm is a Lecturer at the Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney. She researches and writes in the areas of international law and institutions, migration and refugee law, and legal theory. She is currently an Associate of the Australian Human Rights Centre, University of NSW (UNSW), and a member of the Emerging Scholars Network, Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law, UNSW. She was previously a Senior Fellow at the Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne.

Amanda Elliot works in the Department of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Sydney. Her primary research interests include the transformation of work and welfare in the twenty-first century and, more recently, politics, identity, work and play in the digital economy.

Bert Fraussen is an Assistant Professor at Leiden University, Faculty of Governance and Global Affairs, and a Visiting Research Fellow at The Australian National University, School of Politics and International Relations. His research agenda integrates the organisational design and development of political organisations, notably interest groups, and their involvement in public policy. Particular topics of interest include relations between interest groups and policymakers and the role of stakeholders in policy advisory systems. Bert’s work has been published in journals such as the European Journal of Political Science, Public Administration, Political Studies, Policy Sciences and the Journal of European Public Policy.

Anika Gauja works in the Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney. She teaches and researches in the areas of political parties, comparative politics and Australian politics. She is the author of Party Reform: The Causes, Challenges, and Consequences of Organizational Change (2017) and The Politics of Party Policy: From Members to Legislators (2013), as well as the editor of Party Rules? Dilemmas of Political Party Regulation in Australia (2016, with Marian Sawer) and Party Members and Activists (2015, with Emilie van Haute).

Murray Goot is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Modern History, Politics and International Relations at Macquarie University. His most recent book is The Conscription Conflict and the Great War (2016), co-edited with Robin Archer, Joy Damousi and Sean Scalmer. He is currently working on the history of political campaigning (with Sean Scalmer) and the history of opinion polling.

Antony Green AO has worked as an election analyst with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) since 1989. He is a leading psephologist and publishes a blog on electoral matters at blogs.abc.net.au/antonygreen/. He is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney.

Darren R. Halpin is Professor of Political Science at The Australian National University. His work focuses on interest groups and other political organisation, with particular focus on their engagement in public policy. He is co-editor of the journal Interest Groups & Advocacy.

Simon Jackman is Professor of Political Science and CEO of the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. His research interests span public opinion, polling, election campaigns and electoral systems. His poll averaging algorithms were pioneering in the field, adopted by many scholars, practitioners and media outlets around the world. His 2009 book, Bayesian Analysis for the Social Sciences, details many of these methods. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Society for Political Methodology.

Stewart Jackson is a former youth worker, public servant, political operative and now lecturer in politics at the University of Sydney. He is currently researching the development of Green parties in the Asia–Pacific, and is co-researcher on an ongoing project examining protest activity in Australia.

Carol Johnson is a Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of Adelaide. She has written extensively on Australian politics and the politics of ideology and discourse, and also publishes on issues of gender and sexuality, technology and the politics of emotion. She has contributed to several of the previous election volumes and was a co-editor of Abbott’s Gambit: The 2013 Australian Federal Election (2015).

James Jupp AM is a Visiting Scholar at The Australian National University’s School of Demography. His special interests have included immigration and multiculturalism for over 30 years. He has produced three major encyclopaedias of ethnicity and religion. Since 1948, he has reported on general elections in Britain and Australia, including eight Australian election studies.

Glenn Kefford is a Lecturer in the Department of Modern History, Politics and International Relations at Macquarie University. His research interests include political parties, elections and campaigning.

William Lukamto is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne. His research focuses on analysing online censorship behaviour and policies in authoritarian and authoritarian-democratic regimes. He has also worked as a researcher for government agencies in Australia and Singapore, analysing social media trends and future industries. He currently tutors in digital research methods at the University of Melbourne.

Luke Mansillo is a PhD candidate in the Department of Government and International Relations and the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. He is interested in elections, political behaviour, public opinion and parties in Australia and other advanced democracies in addition to quantitative social research design practice. He has published in the Australian Journal of Political Science and holds a Bachelor of Arts with first-class honours in political science and Masters of Social Research from The Australian National University.

Rob Manwaring is a Senior Lecturer at Flinders University, based in Adelaide. Rob’s research interests include social democratic and labour politics. Rob’s book, The Search for Democratic Renewal: The Politics of Consultation in Britain and Australia, was published in 2014.

Ferran Martinez i Coma is Research Fellow at the Centre for Governance and Public Policy and the Griffith Asia Institute at Griffith University. He has published in Electoral Studies, Party Politics, the European Journal of Political Research and the Australian Journal of Political Science, among others. Previously, he was Research Associate at the Electoral Integrity Project at the University of Sydney.

Brian McNair is Professor of Journalism, Media and Communication at Queensland University of Technology (QUT). He is the author of many books and articles on political media, including Journalism and Democracy: An Evaluation of the Political Public Sphere (2000), Politics, Media and Democracy in Australia: Public and Producer Perceptions of the Political Public Sphere (with Terry Flew, Stephen Harrington and Adam Swift, 2017) and An Introduction to Political Communication (6th edition, 2017). He is a Chief Investigator within QUT’s Digital Media Research Centre.

Rebecca Pearse is a Lecturer in the Department of Political Economy, University of Sydney. Her research spans environmental political economy, social movement studies, feminist political economy and the sociology of knowledge.

David Peetz is Professor of Employment Relations at the Centre for Work, Organisation and Wellbeing at Griffith University. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, author of Unions in a Contrary World: The Future of the Australian Trade Union Movement (1998), Brave New Workplace: How Individual Contracts are Changing our Jobs (2006) and Women of the Coal Rushes (2010) and co-editor of Women, Labor Segmentation and Regulation: Varieties of Gender Gaps (with Georgina Murray, 2017), in addition to numerous academic articles, papers and reports.

Diana Perche is a Senior Lecturer and Academic Coordinator at Nura Gili Indigenous Programs Unit at the University of New South Wales. Prior to this, Diana lectured in public policy at Macquarie University from 2005–16 and was the director of the Master of Politics and Public Policy. Diana has worked in a number of policy-related positions, including in the Australian Public Service, and has a keen interest in the interplay between policy research and policy practice. Her expertise in Australian politics and public policy includes an interest in the use of evidence in policy formulation and a particular focus on Indigenous affairs.

Juliet Pietsch is an Associate Professor in the School of Politics and International Relations at The Australian National University. Her current research focuses on the individual, institutional and contextual factors that hinder the social and political inclusion of migrant and ethnic minority groups in western multicultural societies.

Ben Raue is an electoral and data analyst who writes about elections for the Tally Room and the Guardian Australia. He has been writing about elections in Australia and around the world since 2008.

Matthew D.J. Ryan is a postgraduate research student in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney. His current research is on the relationship between neoliberalism and democracy; he is also broadly interested in state theory and economic history.

Marian Sawer AO is Emeritus Professor and ANU Public Policy Fellow in the School of Politics and International Relations, The Australian National University. Her most recent book (co-edited with Anika Gauja) is Party Rules? Dilemmas of Party Regulation in Australia (2016).

Rodney Smith is Professor of Australian Politics in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney. His current research includes a project on changing voting methods in Australia and another on mass and elite views about policy responsibilities in federal systems.

Paul Strangio is an Associate Professor of Politics in the School of Social Sciences at Monash University. He has written extensively about political leadership and political parties in Australia and has recently completed (with Paul ‘t Hart and James Walter) a two-volume history of the Australian prime ministership: Settling the Office: The Australian Prime Ministership from Federation to Reconstruction (2016) and The Pivot of Power: Australian Prime Ministers and Political Leadership 1949–2016 (2017).

Marija Taflaga is an early career researcher at The Australian National University. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. Her research interests also include comparative Westminster parliaments and oppositions, the career paths of political elites and Australian political history. Marija has undertaken research fellowships at the Australian Parliamentary Library and the Australian Museum of Democracy, Old Parliament House. She has also worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at the Sydney Morning Herald and the Age.

Verity Trott is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne. Her research examines the organisational structures of activism with digital technology and the relationship between technology, society and feminism. She tutors in new media and digital research methods.

Ariadne Vromen is Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Sydney. Her research interests include political participation, social movements, advocacy organisations, digital politics and young people and politics. Her new book, Digital Citizenship and Political Engagement: The Challenge from Online Campaigning and Advocacy Organisations (2017), looks at the emergence of online advocacy organisations and the effect of GetUp! on campaigning in Australia.

Max Walden is the Southeast Asia reporter for Asian Correspondent and a Research Assistant for the Sydney Asia Pacific Migration Centre at the University of Sydney. He has previously worked in the civil society sector in Australia and Indonesia.

James Walter is Emeritus Professor of Politics at Monash University, with interests in leadership, biography, policy deliberation and the history of ideas. His latest book (with Paul Strangio and Paul ‘t Hart) is The Pivot of Power: Australian Prime Ministers and Political Leadership 1949–2016 (2017). He is now completing a history of the Australian government and patterns of policy deliberation between the late 1940s and the present.

John Wanna is the Sir John Bunting Professor of Public Administration at The Australian National University and national research director for the Australian and New Zealand School of Government.

Blair Williams is a PhD candidate in the School of Politics and International Relations at The Australian National University. Her work largely examines media representations of women politicians and political leaders. Her general research interests include women politicians, feminist theory, Australian politics, the media and queer theory.

Scott Wright is a Senior Lecturer in Political Communication at the University of Melbourne. He has published in the top-ranked media, communication and politics journals, including New Media & Society and the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. He has held grants from the United Kingdom’s Economic and Social Research Council, Research Councils of the United Kingdom and the European Union amongst others.


Previous Next