Talking and Listening in the Age of Modernity

Essays on the history of sound


Table of Contents

Introduction
1. A ‘Roaring Decade’: Listening to the Australian gold-fields
2. A Complex Kind of Training: Cities, technologies and sound in jazz-age Europe
The machine age
The jazz age
Sound of the city/dissonant modernism
3. Speech, Children and the Federation Movement
4. Sounds of History: Oratory and the fantasy of male power
In my wildest egotistical dreams
Independent manhood
He spoke so well they thought he was beautiful
The British Prime Minister trounced
In conclusion: only talk
5. Hunting the Wild Reciter: Elocution and the Art of Recitation
The poetry generation
Resuscitating an immoral piece of poultry
Radio killed the poetry star?
6. World English? How an Australian Invented ‘Good American Speech’
7. ‘The Australian Has a Lazy Way of Talking’: Australian character and accent, 1920s–1940s
Australian accent: ‘the detestable snuffle’
‘There is nothing wrong with Australian speech’
8. Towards a History of the Australian Accent
9. Voice, Power and Modernity
10. Modernity, Intimacy and Early Australian Commercial Radio
11. Talking Salvation for the Silent Majority
Australia’s ‘talkie war’
Preventing extinction of the Australian enterprise
‘Quality’ of local, regional and national ingenuity
Conclusion: Australia’s experience of modernity in sound
Acknowledgements
Authors
Index