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Abbott’s Gambit: The 2013 Australian Federal Election

Contributors

Andrew Bartlett was a Queenland Senator with the Australian Democrats for over 10 years, being Parliamentary Leader from 2002–04, as well as holding many other positions within the party. On the Democrats’ demise, he joined the Greens, standing as a candidate twice. He is currently the Convenor of the Queensland Greens.

Clive Bean is a professor of Political Science and Director of Undergraduate Studies at the Queensland University of Technology. He is a director of the Australian Election Study, which has surveyed the Australian electorate each election year since 1987.

Peter John Chen is a senior lecturer in Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney. He is the author of Australian Politics in a Digital Age (2013) and Electronic Engagement: A Guide for Public Managers (2007).

Brian Costar is a professor at Swinburne University’s Institute for Social Research and specialises in Australian politics and elections and parliamentary studies. He has co-authored a number of publications on the rise of independents including Rebels with a Cause: Independents in Australian Politics (2004).

Jennifer Curtin is an associate professor in Comparative Politics and Public Policy at the University of Auckland. Previously, she taught Politics and Policy at Monash University and the University of Canberra and held a postdoctoral position at The Australian National University. Her research has focused on the representation of women in formal political institutions and policy making environments, and rural and regional representation, and the rise of independents, in Australian and New Zealand politics.

Nick Economou is a senior lecturer in the School of Political and Social Inquiry, Monash University. He has published books and journal articles on national and state government in Australia and is a media commentator on Australian national and state politics, contributing regularly to the ABC, 3AW, the BBC, The Conversation, and various newspapers.

Wayne Errington is a senior lecturer in Politics and Public Policy at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of numerous articles on political communication, political parties and leadership, and co-author of John Winston Howard: The Definitive Biography.

Murray Goot is Distinguished Professor and Australian Research Council Australian Professorial Fellow at the Department of Modern History, Politics and International Relations, Macquarie University. He is widely recognised as one of Australia’s leading academic analysts of public opinion and has written widely in this area.

Gwendolyn Gray AO is an adjunct fellow in the School of Politics and International Relations at The Australian National University, where she previously taught and wrote on Australian and international health and welfare policies, particularly on the way policies affect women. She has been a member of the Australian women’s health movement for over 20 years, serving on the executives of Sexual Health and Family Planning ACT, Sexual Health and Family Planning Australia and the Australian Women’s Health Network.

Antony Green is an election analyst with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. He is a leading psephologist and has analysed elections for the ABC since 1989. He has contributed election analysis to publications such as the Sydney Morning Herald and Crikey, and his blog can be found at: blogs.abc.net.au/antonygreen/.

Simon Jackman is a professor of Political Science and (by courtesy) of Statistics at Stanford University. Jackman’s teaching and research centres on the application of statistical methods in the social sciences, with a particular focus on issues in democratic politics (public opinion, election campaigns, political participation, and electoral systems). Jackman worked as a polling analyst for Huffington Post ahead of the US 2012 presidential election and for Guardian Australia during the 2013 Australian federal election. He can be contacted by email: jackman@stanford.edu.

Dean Jaensch AO is Professor (Academic Status) of Politics at Flinders University. He is the author and co-author of 20 books, and of numerous chapters and articles, mainly on themes of Australian politics. He has edited four books and a professional journal. For over 40 years he has had a wide involvement with public political education, and with political and electoral analysis and commentary. He has a constant relationship with the media, commenting on political matters.

Carol Johnson is a professor of Politics at the University of Adelaide. She is a former president of the Australian Political Studies Association, the peak body of Australian political scientists; a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia and currently serves on the Academy’s Executive Committee. Her key research interests lie in the areas of Australian politics, ideology and discourse, gender and sexuality, and the politics of emotion. Her key books include Governing Change: From Keating to Howard (2000) and The Labor Legacy: Curtin, Chifley, Whitlam, Hawke (1989).

James Jupp AM, FASSA is a regular contributor to Australian election studies and specialises in the politics of ‘ethnic’ areas and issues. He is an adjunct associate professor in the Australian Demographic and Social Research Institute at ANU and formerly taught political science at universities in Melbourne, York (UK) and Waterloo (Canada). His many publications include The Australian People (1988 and 2001), From White Australia to Woomera (2002 and 2007) and The Encyclopedia of Religion in Australia (2009).

Tom King is a PhD student in the School of Politics and International Relations at The Australian National University. He was previously a public servant for 30 years, working in the Australian Taxation Office and the Department of Social Security.

Hsu-Ann Lee holds a Bachelor of Laws/Bachelor of Arts (Spanish Honours) from The Australian National University and is currently a research assistant for the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG) at ANU.

Brian Loughnane is the Federal Director of the Liberal Party of Australia and was the Coalition’s National Campaign Director for the 2004, 2007, 2010 and 2013 federal elections. He has been a party member for over 30 years, serving in various roles at both state and federal level.

Haydon Manning, of the Department of Politics and Public Policy at Flinders University, is a frequent commentator on South Australian and national politics whose main research interests focus on political attitudes, voting behaviour, South Australian and federal elections, political parties, environmental politics, and political cartoons.

Rob Manwaring teaches politics and public policy at Flinders University, South Australia. His forthcoming book on British and Australian Labour and democratic renewal will be published in 2014.

Ian McAllister is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at The Australian National University, and from 1997 until 2004 was Director of the Research School of Social Sciences at ANU. He is a director of the Australian Election Study, which has surveyed the Australian electorate each election year since 1987.

Kirsty McLaren is undertaking a PhD on social movements in sub-Saharan Africa, in the School of Politics and International Relations at The Australian National University. As a research associate with the Mapping the Australian Women’s Movement project, she contributed to The Women’s Movement in Protest, Institutions and the Internet.

Narelle Miragliotta is a lecturer in Australian Politics at Monash University. Her research interests are in the area of political institutions, with a focus on political parties, parliament, and elections and electoral systems, particularly in Australia.

Lionel Orchard teaches Public Policy at Flinders University, South Australia. Lionel has published widely, particularly in the area of housing policy in Australia. His most recent book Australian Public Policy: Progressive Ideas in the Neoliberal Ascendency is an edited collection with Chris Miller on Australian public policy.

Robert Phiddian, Deputy Dean of the School of Humanities at Flinders University, researches political satire particularly in the contexts of 18th century British literature and contemporary Australian political cartoons.

Jennifer Rayner is a doctoral candidate with the Centre for the Study of Australian Politics at The Australian National University, where she researches election campaign strategy in Australian state and federal politics.

Nicholas Reece is a Public Policy fellow at the University of Melbourne. He has significant experience in election campaigns with previous roles including Director of Strategy for Prime Minister Julia Gillard and Party Secretary and Campaign Director for the Australian Labor Party in Victoria.

Geoff Robinson is a senior lecturer in Politics and Australian Studies at Deakin University, Waurn Ponds campus. He is a regular media commentator on Australian politics and author of When the Labor Party Dreams: Class, Politics and Policy in New South Wales 1930–1932 (2008). He can be followed on Twitter: @geoffpolhist.

Marian Sawer AO is Emeritus Professor in the School of Politics and International Relations at The Australian National University. Her most recent book (co-edited with Sarah Maddison) is The Women’s Movement in Protest, Institutions and the Internet: Australia in Transnational Perspective (2013).

Paul Strangio is an associate professor of Politics in the School of Social Sciences at Monash University. A specialist in Australian political history he has written widely on political leadership and political parties. His most recent book, Neither Power Nor Glory: 100 Years of Political Labor in Victoria, 1856–1956 (Melbourne University Press, 2012) won the 2013 Henry Mayer Book Prize for Australian Politics.

James Walter is a professor of Politics in the School of Social Sciences at Monash University. He has written widely on leadership, biography, and political ideas. His most recent book, What were they thinking? The politics of ideas in Australia (2010) won the 2011 Henry Mayer Book Prize for Australian Politics.

John Wanna holds the Sir John Bunting Chair of Public Administration at The Australian National University, and is the National Research Director for the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG). He has published widely on Australian politics and public policy.

Rae Wear teaches and researches Queensland and Australian politics in the School of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Queensland. She has written books, chapters and articles on Queensland’s premiers, state and federal politics, Australian political parties and populism.

George Wright is the General Secretary of the Australian Labor Party. He was previously Director of Policy and Communications at the Australian Council of Trade Unions and Press Secretary to the Prime Minister in the Rudd Labor Government.

Sally Young is a reader in Political Science in the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Melbourne. She was the Research Director for the University’s 2013 Election Watch project. Funding for the project, and for subsequent research (including this chapter), was provided by the Melbourne School of Government.


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