The Social Effects of Native Title

Recognition, Translation, Coexistence


Table of Contents

Notes on contributors
Abbreviations and acronyms
1. The social effects of native title
Recognition
Translation
Coexistence
Conclusion
References
2. Performing law
Introduction
A brief ethnography of the court: performance and enactment
The arena
Who gets to speak, and how
The witness statement—neither fish nor fowl?
The Yolngu response
The insertion of performance: sacred power made manifest
The advantages of giving ‘non-evidence’
Ancestral forces insert their own performance
The insistence on difference
Conclusion
Acknowledgments
References
3. Claim, culture and effect
Law and culture
A historical view
Objectifying culture in the context of native title
‘Tradition’, property relations, and the constitution
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
4. Effects of native title recognition in the northern Kimberley
Some initial effects of the judgement on local lives
The Indigenous Land Corporation as a new pastoral boss
The effects of the court process itself
Conclusion
References
5. ‘We’re tired from talking’
Kaanju Ngaachi: Kaanju Pama
Kaanju governance
Chuulangun Aboriginal Corporation
Background to the claim
The native title process
Native title and State land dealings
Conclusion
References
6. Towards an uncertain community?
Introduction
The limits of recognition
Fundamental coexistence
Beyond formalism, towards community?
Conclusion
References
7. Native title and the Torres Strait
Neitiv (‘native’) and porena (‘foreigner’)
The Torres Strait Islander Land Act and the Gau Clan
Native title
Warraberalgal
Reflections
References
8. ‘No vacancies at the Starlight Motel’
Native title and the colonial process
Modern Larrakiya identity and native title
Larrakiya and the ‘long grassers’
The Larrakia claim over Darwin
Larrakiya identity co-opted
Conclusion: an uncertain identity
References
9. Native title and the urban Koori traditional custodian
Background to the New South Wales Land Rights Act
Historical background
What constitutes an Aboriginal land council?
The Sydney experience
Conclusion
Acknowledgments
References
10. Beyond native title
Introduction
MLDRIN: a brief introduction
Traditional ownership, native title and establishing MLDRIN
A confederation of Nations
Election processes and the diversity of political identities
Incorporation, governance, and certainty
Conclusion
Acknowledgments
References
11. The limits of recognition
The recognition of recognition
Justice from recognition
The limits of recognition
Recognising change
Dealing with change over time
Taking change seriously
Conclusion
References
12. History, oral history, and memoriation in native title
History vs anthropology
History, narrative, ethnohistory
References

List of Figures

2.1. The ritual space of the court
2.2. The ‘translation’ steps in a witness statement
2.3. The opening ceremony: approach to the court
2.4. The opening ceremony: in the court
2.5. The court at the edge of the Yolngu law space
2.6. The return from the Yolngu law space
2.7. Mungurru on a calm day
2.8. Mungurru on the day of the ‘view’
5.1. Kaanju homelands showing clan estates
8.1. Itinerant protestors in Darwin
8.2. Cover of Kujuk
8.3. Cover of Longgrass
10.1. The Indigenous nations of the Murray–Darling system