Table of Contents

Preliminary Pages
Information systems foundations
I. Foundations of information systems theory and research
1. Towards an understanding of theory
Introduction
The lingering death of positivism
A ‘scientific’ perspective
Interpretivism and constructivism
A typology of theory for information systems
Concluding remarks
2. The development of ‘grand’ theory
Introduction
Information systems: fading into the background
‘Information systems as a reference discipline’ – Baskerville and Myers
A problem of visibility
The value of cultural capital
Theory as symbolic capital
Finding a site for grand information systems theory
Existing portfolio-level theory
Toward a structural theory of information systems
Conclusions and recommendations
3. The reality of information systems research
Introduction
Characterising information systems research
Ontology
Approaches to categorisation
Approaches to the literary work of art
Providing for perspectives: identifying an appropriate reference ontology
Establishing and empirically validating ontological categories
Conclusions
4. Qualitative research in information systems
Introduction
Qualitative research perspective
Grounded theory
Personal construct theory
Narrative inquiry
Conclusions
II. Research methods, reference theories and information systems
5. Issues and design
Introduction
Background
Grounded theory and case study
Walking the research model
Particular characteristics of the method
Demands and risks of grounded theory
Conclusion
6. The Denver International Airport Baggage Handling System
Introduction
Making sense of hermeneutics
Practical hermeneutics
Research method
First cycle
Second cycle
Third cycle
Fourth cycle
Fifth cycle
Sixth cycle
Reflections
Conclusions
7. Institutional facts
Introduction
Success at the local scale
If logical databases are the solution, what is the problem?
What sorts of applications satisfy the requirements for logical databases?
How does this view help?
How can we build on this?
8. A fresh approach to IS/IT gender research?
Introduction
Background
Method
Findings
Validity
Discussion
Conclusions
9. Reflection in self-organised systems
Introduction
Reflection
Reflection types
Reflective culture
Self-organisation
Reflection in self-organisation
Description of process
Conclusion
Future research
10. Strategic knowledge sharing
Introduction
Wicked problems and wicked systems
Self-organisation
Small-worlds
Examples
Implications and conclusion
11. Explaining organisational change
Introduction
Closed systems and organisational theories
Open systems and organisation theories
Organisational life cycle: growth, maturity, decline and death
The dissipative systems model
Implications for organisations
Order through fluctuations and system transformation
Model synthesis and discussion
Tools for system manipulation
Bifurcations and self-organisation
Conclusion
Acknowledgement
III. Linking information systems theory and practice
12. Research as an information systems domain
Introduction
e-Science and e-Research
Information systems
Research, human activity systems, and ICT
Information systems in research
Research and practice interoperability
Conclusion
13. A procedural model for ontological analyses
Introduction
Shortcomings of current ontological analyses
Reference methodology for conducting ontological analyses
Summary and future work
14. Lessons learned from manual systems
Introduction
Information systems design and theories of agency
Learning from evolved manual systems
Discussion and conclusions
15. Conversations at the electronic frontier
Introduction
Language and power
Information systems with social autonomy
The information systems business language (ISBL)
Actor network theory
Social impacts of the ISBL
Imposing the ISBL
Vocabulary control
The scope of the ISBL
Conclusion
References