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Transcending the Culture–Nature Divide in Cultural Heritage

Biographies

Sally Brockwell is a Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology and Natural History, College of Asia and the Pacific at The Australia National University, Canberra. She has worked extensively in northern Australia and East Timor focusing on hunter-gatherer adaptations in the mid to late Holocene. Currently she is researching earth mound sites and environmental change in northern Australia.

Steve Brown is a Cultural Heritage Researcher with the New South Wales government, in Sydney, Australia and a PhD candidate at the University of Sydney. His research interests include the intangible values of landscape (particularly around attachment, belonging and place); the heritage of ephemeral and ‘ordinary’ physical traces of history across landscapes; applied approaches to managing heritage values of bio-cultural landscapes; and the heritage of landscapes with the imprint of Indigenous and colonial settler interaction. Steve is the author of Cultural Landscapes: A Practical Guide for Park Management (2010).

David Bulbeck is a Senior Research Associate at the Department of Archaeology and Natural History in the College of Asia and the Pacific at The Australian National University, Canberra. His primary research interests are the Holocene archaeology and biological anthropology of southwest Sulawesi and the Malay Peninsula. His recent sole authored publications include: ‘Biological and cultural evolution in the population and culture history of Malaya’s anatomically modern inhabitants’ (2011); ‘Uneven development in southwest Sulawesi, Indonesia during the Early Metal Phase’ (2010); and ‘An archaeological perspective on the diversification of the languages of the South Sulawesi stock’ (2008).

Denis Byrne leads the research program in cultural heritage at the Office of Environment and Heritage (New South Wales) in Sydney, Australia. He is also Adjunct Professor at the Transforming Cultures Centre, University of Technology, Sydney. His interests include the materiality of popular religion, the everyday engagement of people in Asia and Australia with their material past, and fictocritical archaeological writing, the latter resulting in his 2007 book, Surface Collection.

Boonyarit Chaisuwan graduated in Archaeology from the Silpakorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. Currently, he is with the 15th Regional Office of Fine Arts, Phuket. Most recently he has authored the chapter 'Early contacts between India and the Andaman Coast in Thailand from the Second Century BCE to Eleventh Century CE' and his 2009 book Thung Tuk: A Settlement Linking Together the Maritime Silk Route.

Harley Coyne is a Traditional Owner and project officer with the Department of Indigenous Affairs (Southern Region, Western Australia) and an active community member with a variety of programs throughout southern Western Australia.

Tim Denham is a Research Fellow in Archaeology at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia. His research focuses on the emergence and transformation of agriculture in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. He was the lead author and organiser of Papua New Guinea’s successful nomination of the Kuk Swamp site to UNESCO’s World Heritage List (2008).

Vernice Gillies is chair of the Albany Heritage Reference Group Aboriginal Corporation (AHRGAC) in Western Australia and is recognised widely as a community leader and facilitator.  Vern has held a number of important and diverse positions within health, education, heritage, natural resource management and community programs throughout southern Western Australia.

David Guilfoyle is a Project Archaeologist at Northern Land Use Research Inc., Alaska, USA and Managing Director of Applied Archaeology International, Albany, Australia.  He is a Research Associate with the Western Australian Museum and the Centre of Excellence in Natural Resource Management, University of Western Australia, Perth.  David is also a coordinator of two community heritage foundations, the Gabbie Kylie Foundation and the Dowark Foundations, hosted under the auspices of the National Trust of Australia (Western Australia).  He recently coordinated and delivered an award-winning, community natural resource management project throughout southern Western Australia and continues to focus his research interests on the integration of traditional knowledge, landscape archaeology, and the interplay of cultural and natural resource management

Anna Karlström finished her PhD in archaeology at Uppsala University in 2009 and is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. Her research interests include heritage studies, contemporary perspectives on archaeology, the past and its materialities, and Southeast Asian and Australian indigeneity. Her PhD thesis resulted in the book Preserving Impermanence: the creation of heritage in Vientiane, Laos (2009).

Chaowalit Khowkhiew is a Lecturer in prehistoric archaeology in the Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. His research interests include Pleistocene archaeology in Peninsula Thailand.

Suengki Kwak is a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Washington, Seattle, USA. His research interests include the transition from hunter-gatherers to farmers in East and Southeast Asia, especially South Korea and archaeological applications of organic geochemistry.

Ian Lilley has worked in Australasian and Indo-Pacific archaeology and heritage for over 30 years. He is an ICOMOS World Heritage Assessor and Secretary-General of ICOMOS/ICAHM. His interests include indigenising archaeology and heritage management, migration and trade, social identity, ethics, and the role of archaeology and heritage in contemporary society.

Nick McClean is a researcher and freelance radio producer currently based in the School of Culture, History and Language at The Australian National University, Canberra. As part of his doctoral thesis he is undertaking oral history and cultural heritage research in a number of communities in Australia, India, Indonesia and East Timor. His key areas of interest are cross-cultural and comparative analyses of conservation, community conservation initiatives, and the co-management of protected areas with indigenous communities. He has also produced feature length radio documentaries for the Australian Broadcasting Commission in collaboration with Indigenous groups in Australia and East Timor.

Andrew McWilliam is a Senior Fellow and Head of the Department of Anthropology in the College of Asia and the Pacific at The Australian National University, Canberra. He has published widely on the ethnography of Timor, and has continuing research interests in East Timor, Eastern Indonesia and northern Australia. Recent work has focused on issues of governance, community economies and ritual exchange, resource tenures and plantation histories. He is co-editor with E.G. Traube of the volume, Land and Life in Timor-Leste: Ethnographic Essays (2011).

Ben Marwick is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. His interests include hunter-gatherer archaeology, technology and human ecology in mainland Southeast Asia and Australia. His co-edited volumes include Keeping your Edge: Recent Approaches to the Organisation of Stone Artefact Technology (2011) and New Directions in Archaeological Science (Fairbairn et al. 2009). He is co-editor of the Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association.

Myles Mitchell is a research and consulting archaeologist with Applied Archaeology International and a PhD candidate at the National Centre for Indigenous Studies, The Australian National University, Canberra. Maintaining a focus on contemporary culture, identity and values within custodian communities, Myles is committed to working towards an archaeology that is socially and culturally relevant to custodian communities as well as being solutions-oriented for cultural heritage management.

Cat Morgan is currently working on her Master of Arts thesis at the University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom, with her research based on the Lake Pleasant View heritage complex in southern Western Australia.  She is assisting with the development of an interactive mapping program with the Esperance Traditional Owners as well as several other projects with Applied Archaeology International.

Sue O’Connor is Professor in the Department of Archaeology and Natural History in the College of Asia and the Pacific at The Australian National University, Canberra. Her research focuses on the evidence for migration and colonisation in the Indo-Pacific region, as well as on theoretical issues surrounding early human migration such as maritime capacity, technological innovation and symbolling. She has undertaken numerous research projects in Australia, Indonesia and East Timor. Her recent co-edited volumes include Rethinking Cultural Resource Management in Southeast Asia (Miksic et al. 2011) and Islands of Inquiry: Colonisation, Seafaring and the Archaeology of Maritime Landscapes (Clark et al. 2008).

Sandra Pannell has a doctorate in anthropology from the University of Adelaide, Australia and she currently works as a consultant anthropologist in the field of Native Title and cultural heritage research, as well as being an Adjunct Senior Research Fellow with the School of Arts and Social Sciences at James Cook University in Cairns, Australia. She has held lecturing and research positions at the University of Adelaide, James Cook University, at the Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies at The Australian National University, and at the Rainforest Cooperative Research Centre in Cairns. She has undertaken anthropological research in Indonesia, Timor-Leste, and throughout Aboriginal Australia. Sandra Pannell is the author of two books, one on World Heritage (2006) and the other on an Indigenous environmental history of North Queensland (2006). She is also the editor of a book on violence, society and the state in Indonesia (2003) and the co-editor of two publications – one on resource management in eastern Indonesia (1998) and the other on Indigenous planning in northern Australia (Larsen and Pannell 2006). She is the author of a number of articles on kinship, intellectual property rights, native title, resource management and marine tenure.

Rasmi Shoocongdej is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Archaeology at Silpakorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. She specialises in late Pleistocene to post-Pleistocene tropical foragers and works along the western border of Thailand including Mae Hong Son and Kanchanaburi provinces. She has also published on nationalism and archaeology, looting and public education. She holds several professional positions, including senior representative for the World Archaeological Congress, advisory board member for World Archaeology, Asian Perspectives, Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association, and Archaeologies (World Archaeological Congress).

Anita Smith is Research Associate in Archaeology at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia with 20 years research experience in the Pacific Islands and Australia. Since 2002 she has worked with Pacific Island communities and Governments and as consultant to UNESCO in the World Heritage Pacific 2009 Program. In 2008-2011 she was a member of the Australian delegation to the World Heritage Committee. Anita is co-author of the ICOMOS thematic study Cultural Landscapes of the Pacific Islands (2007) and editor of World Heritage in a Sea of Islands: the Pacific 2009 Program (2012).

Daud Aris Tanudirjo (PhD 2001 Australian National University) is an archaeologist who is currently Vice Dean of Research, Community Service and Cooperation Affairs in the Faculty of Cultural Sciences at Gadjah Mada University, Jogjakarta, Indonesia. His research focuses on prehistoric archaeology and cultural heritage management in the Indonesian archipelago.

Cholawit Thongcharoenchaikit is a researcher in vertebrate palaeontology at the Natural History Section of the Thailand National Science Museum, Bangkok. His interests include human-environment relations in peninsular Thailand during the late Holocene.

Cate Turk is undertaking PhD research at the Institute for Geography, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg in Erlangen, Germany, where she is a Lecturer in the Cultural Geography and Orient research group. She was awarded a Masters of Philosophy in cultural geography, Geography Department, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland in 2001. From 2003-2006 Cate was a Policy Officer in the Australian Department for Environment and Heritage where she worked at Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia and as an Australia Youth Ambassador for Development in the Department of Culture and Heritage, National Government of Fiji Islands.

References

Brown, S. 2010. Cultural Landscapes: A Practical Guide for Park Management. Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water, NSW Government, Sydney.

Bulbeck, D. 2011. Biological and cultural evolution in the population and culture history of Malaya’s anatomically modern inhabitants. In: Enfield, N. (ed.), Dynamics of human diversity. Pacific Linguistics 627. Australian National University, Canberra.

Bulbeck, D. 2010. Uneven development in southwest Sulawesi, Indonesia during the Early Metal Phase. In: Bellina, B., Bacus, E. Pryce, T. and Wisseman Christie, J. (eds.), Fifty years of archaeology in Southeast Asia: Essays in honourof Ian Glover, pp. 26-39. River Books, Bangkok.

Bulbeck, D. 2008. An archaeological perspective on the diversification of the languages of the South Sulawesi stock. In: Simanjutak, T. (ed.), Austronesians in Sulawesi, pp. 185-212. Center for Prehistoric and Austronesian Studies, Jakarta.

Byrne, D. 2007. Surface collection: Archaeological travels in Southeast Asia. Altamira Press, Lanham, Maryland, USA.

Chaisuwan, B. 2011. Early contacts between India and the Andaman Coast in Thailand from the Second Century BCE to Eleventh Century CE. In: Manguin, P-Y, Mani, A. and Wade, G. (eds), Early interactions between South and Southeast Asia: Reflections on cross-cultural exchange, pp. 83-112. Institute of South East Asian Studies, Singapore.

Chaisuwan, B. and Naiyawat, R. 2009. Thung Tuk: A settlement linking together the maritime silk route. Trio Creation, Songkhla.

Clark, G.R., Leach, F. and O'Connor, S. (eds) 2008. Islands of inquiry: Colonisation, seafaring and the archaeology of maritime landscapes. Terra Australis 29. ANU E Press, Canberra.

Fairbairn, A., O'Connor, S. and Marwick, B. (eds) 2009. New Directions in Archaeological Science. Terra Australis 28. ANU EPress, Canberra.

Karlström, A. 2009. Preserving Impermanence: The creation of heritage in Vientiane, Laos. Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

McWilliam, A. and Traube, E.G. 2011. Land and life in Timor-Leste: Ethnographic essays. ANU EPress, Canberra.

Marwick, B. and MacKay, A. 2011. Keeping your edge: Recent approaches to the organisation of stone artefact technology. BAR S2273. Archaeopress, Oxford.

Miksic, J., Goh, G. and O'Connor, S. (eds) 2011. Rethinking cultural resource management in Southeast Asia; Preservation, development, and neglect, Anthem Press, London.

Pannell, S. 2006. Reconciling Nature and Culture in a Global Context? Lessons from the World Heritage List. Cooperative Research Centre for Tropical Rainforest Ecology and Management. Rainforest CRC, Cairns, Australia.

Pannell, S. 2006. (with contributions from Ngadjon-Jii Traditional Owners) Yamani Country: A spatial history of the Atherton Tableland, North Queensland. Research Report No. 43. Cooperative Research Centre for Tropical Rainforest Ecology and Management. Rainforest CRC, Cairns, Australia.

Pannell, S. (ed.) 2003. A state of emergency: Violence, society and the state in Eastern Indonesia. CDU Press, Darwin.

Pannell, S. and von Benda-Beckmann, F. (eds) 1998. Old World places, New World problems: Exploring issues of resource management in Eastern Indonesia. Australian National University Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Canberra.

Larsen, L. and Pannell, S. 2006. Developing the wet tropics Aboriginal cultural and natural resource management plan: Workshop proceedings. Report No. 45. Cooperative Research Centre for Tropical Rainforest Ecology and Management. Rainforest CRC, Cairns, Australia.

Smith, A. and Jones, K. 2007. Cultural landscapes of the Pacific Islands: ICOMOS thematic study. UNESCO World Heritage Centre, Paris.

Smith, A. (ed.) 2012. World Heritage in a sea of islands: The Pacific 2009 Program. UNESCO, Paris.


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