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Master Poets, Ritual Masters

7

Suti Solo do Bina Bane: Version VI from the Domain of Termanu

Introduction

My first meeting with Mikael Pellondou in 1988 was brief and quite unexpected. My request for a recitation of Suti Solo do Bina Bane may have taken him by surprise but he hardly hesitated. His response was immediate. He took little time to reflect or prepare himself before beginning his recitation.

Five years later, on another visit to Rote, I was able to meet Mikael again and once more ask him to recite Suti Solo do Bina Bane for me. My second request prompted a similar, immediate response. Unlike Malesi, whose second recitation is significantly different from his first, Mikael’s second recitation, some five years after his first composition for me, produced a version of Suti Solo do Bina Bane that was remarkably similar to his first version. The similarity between these two versions provides further understanding of poetic memory and composition.

In presenting this composition, I have divided it at the same junctures as the first composition.

Prefatory Lines

1.

Ita kokolak Bina Bane

We speak of Bina Bane

2.

Ma ita dede’ak Suti Solo

And we talk of Suti Solo

3.

Te hu Bina nai liun

But Bina is in the ocean

4.

Ma Suti nai sain.

And Suti is in the sea.

5.

Hu lae:

Hence they say:

Introduction of the Chief Chant Character

6.

Inaka Fua Bafa

The woman Fua Bafa

7.

Ma fetoka Lole Holu

And the girl Lole Holu

8.

Na-nea pelak

Cares for the maize

9.

Ma na-nea betek.

And cares for the millet.

10.

De ana oku boluk tunga seli

She shouts at one side

11.

Ma do se’ek tunga seli

And she screams at one side

12.

Ma bafi na’a tunga seli

And the pig eats at one side

13.

Ma kode ketu tunga seli.

And the monkey plucks at one side.

14.

De faik esa manunin

At a certain day

15.

Do ledok esa mate’ena

Or at a particular time

16.

Boe ma ana teli kokolo ndai

She strings, winding a fishnet

17.

Fo ndai mahamu lilok

A fishnet with a gold-weighted belly

18.

Ma ana ane seseko meti

And she braids, twining a scoop-net

19.

Fo seko matei besik.

A scoop-net with iron-weighted insides.

20.

De neu seko sisi’u enggak

Then she goes to scoop, lifting enggak seaweed

21.

Ma neu ndai huhuka batu.

And goes to net fish, overturning rocks.

22.

Ana lipa neu nakanae

She looks around carefully

23.

Ma lelu nala mumula

And glances intently

24.

Neu meti Tefi Noe Mina la

Goes to the tide at Tefi Noe Mina

25.

Tasi Fopo Sandi-kala

The sea at Fopo Sandi-kala

26.

Ma meti Tefi Noe Mina la

And the tide at Tefi Noe Mina

27.

Leu huka papa

[The sea] shows its shallows

28.

Ma meti la si’unu.

And the tide begins to ebb.

29.

Ma ana ane seko la

And she braids the scoop-net

30.

Fo seko matei besik

The scoop-net with iron-weighted insides

31.

Ma ana teli kokolo ndai

And she strings, winding the fishnet

32.

Fo ndai mahamu lilok.

The fishnet with a gold-weighted belly.

33.

Tasi la huka papa

The sea shows its shallows

34.

Ma meti la si’unu.

And the tide begins to ebb.

35.

Boe ma ndae ndai neu alun

So she hangs the fishnet over her shoulder

36.

Su seko neu langa.

Balances the scoop-net on her head.

The Search for the Ritual Fish

37.

De neu seko sisi’u enggak

Then she goes to scoop, lifting enggak seaweed

38.

Ma neu ndai huhuka batu

And goes to net fish, overturning rocks.

39.

Fo ana ndai sanga Tio Holu

She fishes, seeking a Tio Holu fish

40.

Ma seko sanga Dusu La’e

And scoops, seeking a Dusu La’e fish

41.

Fo ela Tio la holu ao

Tio that embrace one another

42.

Ma Dusu la’e ao.

And Dusu that support one another.

43.

Te hu ana seko nala lifu esa

But she scoops in one pond

44.

Ma ndai nala lek esa,

And fishes in one pool,

45.

Na, te ta ndai nala Tio

Nah, but she does not fish a Tio

46.

Ma ana ta seko nala Dusu

And she does not scoop a Dusu

47.

Te seko nala lifu esa

But she scoops in one pond

48.

Na Bina nala lifu esa

Nah, Bina is in that pond

49.

Ma ana ndai nala lek dua

And she fishes in two pools

50.

Na Suti nala lek dua.

Nah, Suti is in the two pools.

The Initial Dialogue with the Shells

51.

De ana kokolak

Then she speaks

52.

Ma ana dede’ak:

And she talks:

53.

‘O, au mai seko sanga Dusu La’e dei

‘Oh, I only come to scoop for a Dusu La’e

54.

Ma ndai sanga Tio Holu dei

And only fish for a Tio Holu

55.

Te seko uni o

But I scoop you up

56.

Ma ndai uni o

And I fish you up

57.

Fo soa be ma o nda be?’

For what purpose and what gain?’

58.

Boe ma Bina lole halan

Then Bina raises his voice

59.

Ma Suti a’e dasi na, nae:

And Suti lifts his words, saying:

60.

‘Seko muni Bina

‘Scoop up Bina

61.

Ndai muni Suti

Fish up Suti

62.

Te Suti ta, dae hena

Not Suti, but a human being

63.

Ma Bina ta, hataholi.’

And not Bina, but a living being.’

64.

Boe ma ana ndai ndano neni Bina

So she fishes forth, taking Bina

65.

Ma seko solu neni Suti.

And she scoops up, taking Suti.

66.

‘Na kode a ketu betek

‘The monkey plucks the millet

67.

Ma bafi bei na’a pelak

And the pig still eats the maize

68.

De na’a bei tolesi

He eats, but still some remains

69.

Ma ketu bei ela.

And plucks, but there is still some left.

70.

Mafa ndendelek

So remember, do remember

71.

Ma masa nenedak

And recall, do recall

72.

Mu sona

Go, then

73.

Pa’a au u ai

Tie me to the tree

74.

Isa au neu batu

Fasten me to the rock

75.

Fo toto-toto no batu

To knock and knock against the rock

76.

Ma bengo-bengo no ai.

And shake and shake against the tree.

77.

Kode tolo mu

The monkey will run

78.

Fo lo ai lai neu

High into the trees

79.

Ma bafi nalai

And the pig will flee

80.

Fo lo nula dale neu.

Deep into the woods.

81.

Sama leo hala ma

Just as my voice

82.

Deta leo dasi ma

Just like my words

83.

Kode ana tolo mu

The monkey, he will run

84.

Ma bafi ana nalai

And the pig, he will flee

85.

De leo nula dale neu

Deep into the woods

86.

Ma leo ai lai neu.

And high into the trees.

87.

Boe te pela-lai la fali uma

The corn harvest is returned to the house

88.

Ma bete-lai la tuke lo.

And the millet harvest is brought to the home.

89.

Boe ma Bina o fali uma

So Bina, you return to the house

90.

Ma Suti o tulek lo.’

And Suti, you go back to the home.’

The Directives to the Shells

The only significant difference in this section from the similar section of the first composition is in the addition of the directive to go with the forest cuckoo bird and the river watercock.1

91.

Boe ma ana kokolak

So he speaks

92.

No ina Po’o Pau Ai [Lole Holu]

With the woman Po’o Pau Ai [Lole Holu]1

93.

Ma feto Latu Kai Do [Fua Bafa], nae:

And with the girl Latu Kai Do [Fua Bafa], saying:

94.

‘Bo tiango nou

‘Dear, dear friend

95.

Au sanga tulek ma falik.’

I seek to go back and to return.’

96.

Boe ma nae:

Then she says:

97.

‘Mu mo se?’

‘With whom will you go?’

98.

Inak a Fua Bafa

The woman Fua Bafa

99.

Ma fetok a Lole Holu nae:

And the girl Lole Holu says:

100.

‘Na, mu mo titi’i letek

‘Go with the titi’i bush on the hill

101.

Ma mu mo kai-hule mok.’

And go with the kai-hule shrub in the field.’

102.

‘Malole lai ndia

‘Such things are good there

103.

Ma mandak lai ndia.

And such things are proper right there.

104.

Te kai-hule mok

But the kai-hule shrub in the field

105.

Ndia mesakana nai mok esa

It is all alone in the field

106.

Ma ndia mesakana nai letek esa

And it is all alone on the hill

107.

De au kokolak o se

So with whom will I speak

108.

Ma au dede’ak o se

And with whom will I talk

109.

Sama leo Lole Holu

[Someone] just like Lole Holu

110.

Ma sama leo Fua Bafa?’

And just like Fua Bafa?’

111.

Boe ma nae:

So she says:

112.

‘Na, mu mo dini ana na’u.’

‘Nah, go with the dini grass.’

113.

‘Te dini ana na’u

‘But the dini grass

114.

Leo timu lama tua dulu

When the east monsoon grows great in the east

115.

Ma se lama dilu do lama sesu

It will bend or break

116.

Neu kalena ma neu bu’una,

At this head and at its joint,

117.

Na, au kokolak o se

Then with whom will I speak

118.

Ma au dede’ak o se?’

And with whom will I talk?’

119.

Boe ma nae:

So she says:

120.

‘Mu mo pila kumea letek

‘Go with the red kumea grass on the hill

121.

Ma mu mo nggeo kuku telas.’

And go with the black kuku shrub in the forest.’

122.

‘Te timu lama tua dulu na

‘But when the east monsoon grows great in the east

123.

Ma fak lama nalu langa na

And the west monsoon lengthens at the head

124.

Se pila kumea letek

The red kumea grass on the hill

125.

Do nggeo kuku telas

Or the black kuku shrub in the forest

126.

Se lama dilu neu bu’un

Will bend at its heavy joints

127.

Ma lama sesu neu kalen,

And will break at its heavy head,

128.

Na, au kokolak o se

Nah, then with whom will I speak

129.

Ma au dede’ak o se

And with whom will I talk

130.

Sama leo Lole Holu

[Someone] just like Lole Holu

131.

Ma deta leo Fua Bafa?’

And exactly like Fua Bafa?’

132.

Boe ma ana lole hala na neu

So she raises her voice

133.

Ma ana a’e dasi no neu, nae:

And lifts her words, saying:

134.

‘Na, o mu mo se

‘Nah, with whom will you go

135.

Fo sama leo au bai

[Someone] just like me

136.

Do deta leo au bai?’

Or exactly like me?’

137.

Boe ma nae:

Then she says:

138.

‘Na, mu mo doa lasi anakala

‘Nah, go with the tiny forest cuckoos

139.

Ma mu mo koloba’o le anakala.’

And go with the little river watercocks.’

140.

‘Malole lai na

‘Such things are good there

141.

Ma mandak lai ndia.’

And such things are proper there.’

142.

Lafada ma ladasi, lae:

They speak and they talk, saying:

143.

‘Doa lasi ana-kala

‘[When] the tiny forest cuckoos

144.

Bedoa tunga lasi

Sing doa-doa through the forest

145.

Na udan tunga tunga lasi

As the rain follows through the forest

146.

Ma kolo ba’o le ana-kala

And the little river watercocks

147.

Beba’o tunga le

Sing ba’o-ba’o along the river

148.

Na fa tunga tunga le,

As the current follows along the river,

149.

Au dede’ak o se

With whom will I speak

150.

Ma dede’ak o se?’

And with whom will I speak?’

The Directive to Return to the Sea

151.

Boe ma nae:

So she says:

152.

‘Mu mo ina Po’o Pau Ai la

‘Go with the woman Po’o Pau Ai

153.

Ma feto Latu Kai Do la

And with the girl Latu Kai Do

154.

Nai le [bi]bifan

At the river’s lip

155.

Ma nai oli tatain.’

And the estuary’s edge.’

156.

Boe ma Bina a’e dasi na neu

So Bina lifts his words

157.

Ma Suti lole hala a neu ma nae:

And Suti raises his voice and says:

158.

‘Bo senango nou

‘Oh dear friend

159.

Ma bo tiango nou

And oh dear companion

160.

Malole lai ndia

Such things are good there

161.

Ma mandak lai na,

And such things are proper right there.

162.

De au kokolak o ina Po’o Pau Ai la

I will speak with the woman Po’o Pau Ai

163.

Ma au dede’ak o feto Latu Kai Do

And I will talk with the girl Latu Kai Do

164.

Nai le bifan ma oli tatain

At the river’s lip and estuary’s edge

165.

Sama deta leo dasima:

Just as you say:

166.

“Mu mo ina Po’o Pau Ai la

“Go with the woman Po’o Pau Ai

167.

Do feto Latu Kai Do.”’

Or the girl Latu Kai Do.”’

The Brief Return to the Sea

168.

Boe ma besak tasi mai

Now the sea comes in

169.

De nala oli dale.

And enters the estuary.

170.

Boe ma Bina ana bonu boa

Bina, he floats like boa wood

171.

Ma Suti ana ele piko

And Suti, he bobs like piko wood

172.

De ana ele piko leo liun

He bobs into the ocean

173.

Ma ana bonu boa leo sain neu.

And he floats off into the sea.

174.

Te seko-ma nai liun do sain

As it happens in the ocean or sea

175.

Laka-doto kokolo

It is as lively as a kokolo bird

176.

Ma laka-se bebengu,

And as noisy as horses’ bells,

177.

Te hu ana ta bubuluk

But he is not aware

178.

Do ana ta nalelak.

Or he does not know.

179.

Seko-ma ala be’e Lipe la

As it happens, they perform at the Lipe feast

180.

Ma ala doi dosa

And they are suffering

181.

Leme liun do sain.

In the ocean and the sea.

182.

De ina liu-kala

The women of the ocean

183.

Ma feto sai-kala

And the girls of the sea

184.

Ala foti ma leno lai sain.

They dance and turn in the sea.

185.

De dae sopuka ta lapu

Fine dust does not fly

186.

Ma batu lutu la ta pela.

And small stones do not rise/dance.

187.

Besak ka Bina Bane no Suti Solo

Now Bina Bane or Suti Solo

188.

Ala pela nggangafu aon

They dance, swaying their bodies

189.

Ma leno sosodo aon.

And they turn, shuffling their feet.

190.

Boe ma dae sopuka lapu

Fine dust flies

191.

Ma batu lutu la pela.

And small stones rise.

192.

Boe ma ina liu-kala

The women of the ocean

193.

Do feto sai-kala

Or girls of the sea

194.

Lahala ma lae.

‘Wah.’

195.

De lae: ‘Beuk Suti Solo boe

They say: ‘Something new for Suti Solo

196.

Do fe’ek Bina Bane boe.’

Or something strange for Bina Bane.’

The Return to Rote

197.

De Bina nama toko isi

So Bina throws forth his insides

198.

Ma Suti nama edo nggi.

And Suti puts forth his pods.

199.

Boe ma ana bi’i

He is fearful

200.

Do ana mae.

Or he is ashamed.

201.

Boe ma ana tolu mu sasali

He flees forth quickly

202.

Ma nalai lelena.

And he rushes forth hastily.

203.

De ana tolo mu

He flees

204.

De leo Dela Muli neu

To Dela Muli [Dela in the West]

205.

Ma nalai

And rushes

206.

De leo Ana Iko neu.

To Ana Iko [Ana at the Tail].

207.

De ana nduku Ana Iko

He arrives at Ana Iko

208.

Ana losa Dela Muli.

He reaches Dela Muli.

209.

Boe ma neu tongo senan

He goes to meet a friend

210.

Ma neu nda tian

And goes to encounter a companion

211.

Fo neu nda tia na nai Dela Muli.

Goes to meet a companion at Dela Muli.

212.

Boe ma nae:

He says:

213.

‘Bo tiango nou

‘Oh dear companion

214.

Seko-ma nggolok nai ia.

As it happens the village is here.

215.

Boe ma taduk nai ia boe.’

The settlement is here too.’

216.

Boe ma nae:

So she says:

217.

‘Leo do mapa lasa meme ia

‘Stay and remain here

218.

Te o mai nda au.

You have come to meet me.

219.

De ita dua senak

Let the two of us be friends

220.

Ma ita dua tiak.

And let the two of us be companions.

221.

De neme Dela Muli

Here in Dela Muli

222.

Do neme Ana Iko.’

Or here in Ana Iko.’

Composition Analysis: Mikael’s Versions I and II and Seu Ba’i’s Recitation

The immediate point of comparison for this version of Suti Solo do Bina Bane is Mikael’s first version. The two compositions are nearly the same length. Version I has 224 lines; version II 222 lines. Both versions include the repetition and rephrasing of particular passages. Version I is based on a repertoire of 75 dyadic sets; version II has 79 sets. The two versions have 59 sets in common—in both cases, 75 per cent or more of their dyadic repertoire. Version I shares 38 sets with Seu Ba’i’s composition while version II—largely because of the inclusion of the directive that refers to the ‘forest cuckoo and river watercock’—shares 42 sets with Seu Ba’i. The compositional links among these various recitations are considerable.

Although both of Mikael’s recitations are similar and share a majority of sets in common, the composition arrangement of these two versions—the sequence of lines one to another—is more complex. The general succession of the narrative is much the same but particular lines, couplet lines and sometimes longer passages follow different sequences. Seeming similarity masks a good deal of compositional difference. Table 2 provides a concordance of corresponding lines in the two versions and allows for closer scrutiny of the specifics of composition.

Table 2: A Concordance of Corresponding Lines in the Two Versions of Suti Solo do Bina Bane by Mikael Pellondou

Mikael Pellondou II

Mikael Pellondou I

3

<>

2 + 8

4

<>

3 + 9

6 – 13

<>

10 – 17

17

<>

28

19

<>

27 + 30

22 – 23

<>

32 – 33

25 – 28

<>

34 – 37

30

<>

27 + 30

32

<>

28

37 – 42

<>

38 – 43

43 – 46

<>

44 – 47

47 + 49

<>

50 – 51

48 + 50

<>

52 – 53

58 – 59

<>

60 – 61

66 – 71

<>

66 – 71

73 – 80

<>

72 – 79

81 – 82

<>

82 – 83

83 – 86

<>

76 – 79

89 – 90

<>

99 – 100

100 – 101

<>

120 – 121

102 – 103

<>

123 – 124

104 – 110

<>

126 – 133

111 – 112

<>

137 – 138

114 – 115

<>

144 – 146

117 – 118

<>

147 – 148

120 – 121

<>

105 – 106

122 – 123

<>

111 – 112

124 – 125

<>

109 – 110

126 – 127

<>

113 – 114

128 – 131

<>

115 – 116

132 – 133

<>

60 – 61

134 – 135

<>

135 – 136

151 – 155

<>

161 – 162 + 165 – 166

160 – 161

<>

171 – 172

166 – 167

<>

161 – 162

170 – 171

<>

179 – 180

179

<>

186

181

<>

187

182 – 183

<>

189 – 190

185 – 186

<>

194 – [195]

188 – 189

<>

197 – 198

190 – 191

<>

199 – 200

195 – 200

<>

204 – 208

197 – 198

<>

206 – 207

199 – 200

<>

208

201 – 202

<>

209 – 210

204 + 206

<>

211 – 212

213

<>

218

216 – 217

<>

221 – 223

It is probably best to compare some of the longer passages in the two versions before focusing on particular lines and couplets. Thus, near the beginning of both compositions, there is a sequence of eight lines that are virtually identical.

Passage 1

Version I

10.

Boe te inaka Fua Bafo

So the woman Fua Bafa

11.

Ma fetoka Lole Holu

And the girl Lole Holu

12.

Na-nea pelak

Cares for maize

13.

Ma na-nea betek

And cares for millet

14.

De ana oko boluk tunga seli

She shouts on one side

15.

Ma ana do-se’ek tunga seli

And she screams at one side

16.

Ma bafi na’a tunga seli

And the pig eats on one side

17.

Ma kode ketu tunga seli.

And the monkey plucks at one side.

Version II

6.

Inaka Fua Bafa

The woman Fua Bafa

7.

Ma fetoka Lole Holu

And the girl Lole Holu

8.

Na-nea pelak

Cares for the maize

9.

Ma na-nea betek.

And cares for the millet.

10.

De ana oku boluk tunga seli

She shouts at one side

11.

Ma do se’ek tunga seli

And she screams at one side

12.

Ma bafi na’a tunga seli

And the pig eats at one side

13.

Ma kode ketu tunga seli.

And the monkey plucks at one side.

Except for the use of different connectives—boe te at the beginning of Version I and the optional use of the pronoun ana in line 14 of Version I—these two passages are identical both in their use of dyadic sets and in the order or sequence of lines. One could speculate that these lines constitute a personal routine or extended formula that allows Mikael to begin his recitation on a secure basis.

After this passage, the compositions diverge. In Version I, Mikael has Fua Bafa//Lole Holu ponder how she can prevent the monkey and pig from eating her crops. It is only after this that she takes up her fishing net and goes to the sea. In Version II, Mikael launches immediately into the fishing sequence.

Another early passage of some 12 lines in Version I can be compared with similar lines in Version II. However, the corresponding lines in Version II do not form a single sequence nor do they appear in the same order as in Version I.

Passage 2

Version I

A

32.

De ana lipa naka nanae

She looks around carefully

33.

Ma ana lelu nala mumula.

And she glances intently.

34.

De tasi Fopo Sandika

The sea at Fopo Sandika

35.

Ma meti Tefi Noe Mina

And the tide at Tefi Noe Mina

36.

Tasi la huka papa

The sea shows its shallows

37.

Ma meti la si’unu.

And the tide begins to ebb.

B

38.

Boe ma neu seko sisi’u engga

She goes to scoop, lifting enggak seaweed

39.

Ma neu ndai huhuka batu,

And goes to fish, overturning rocks,

40.

Neu seko sanga Dusu La’e

Goes to scoop in search of a Dusu La’e

41.

Ma neu ndai sanga Tio Holu

And goes to fish in search of a Tio Holu

42.

Fo Dusu la la’e ao

For Dusu fish that support one another

43.

Ma Tio la holu ao.

The Tio fish that embrace one another.

Version II

A

20.

De neu seko sisi’u enggak

Then she goes to scoop, lifting enggak seaweed

21.

Ma neu ndai huhuka batu.

And goes to fish, overturning rocks.

22.

Ana lipa neu nakanae

She looks around carefully

23.

Ma lelu nala mumula

And glances intently

24.

Neu meti Tefi Noe Mina la

Goes to the tide at Tefi Noe Mina

25.

Tasi Fopo Sandi-Kala

The sea at Fopo Sandi-Kala

26.

Ma meti Tefi Noe Mina la

And the tide at Tefi Noe Mina

27.

Leu huka papa

[The sea] shows its shallows

28.

Ma meti la si’unu.

And the tide begins to ebb.

...

33.

Tasi la huka papa

The sea shows its shallows

34.

Ma meti la si’unu.

And the tide begins to ebb.

B

37.

De neu seko sisi’u enggak

Then she goes to scoop, lifting enggak seaweed

38.

Ma neu ndai huhuka batu.

And goes to fish, overturning rocks.

39.

Fo ana ndai sanga Tio Holu

She fishes, seeking a Tio Holu fish

40.

Ma seko sanga Dusu La’e

And scoops, seeking a Dusu La’e fish

41.

Fo ela Tio la holu ao

Tio that embrace each other

42.

Ma Dusu la’e ao.

And Dusu that support each other.

If one takes the sequence of lines in Version I as a starting point, the first six lines (32–37) correspond to six of the last seven lines (22–28) in the sequence in Version II. Both sequences use exactly the same dyadic sets in the same order as follows:

32/22

lipa nae

33/23

lelu mula

34/25

tasi – [name: Fopo Sandika]

35/26

meti – [name: Tefi Noe Mina]

36/27

tasihuka-papa

37/28

meti – si’unu

There are, however, a number of compositional differences, six of which are notable. 1) There is a difference in line 22 (Version II) where a verbal, non-reduplicated neu nakanae is used instead of the reduplicated naka nanae in line 32, as in Version I. 2) Line 24 is an (unnecessary) insertion, which is made redundant by the repetition in line 26. 3) The place names in lines 24–26 are given in plural form (la or kala) in Version II, but singular form in Version I. This is a permissible feature of Rotenese parallel poetry where dyadic characters are cited as often in singular as in plural form, with some poets using a singular form as a contrastive pair with a plural form. 4) The noun tasi (‘sea’) is omitted but clearly implied in line 27 of Version II. 5) In Version II, lines 27 and 28 are repeated as lines 33 and 34. 6) Also in Version II, lines 20 and 21 are repeated as lines 37 and 38.

As a result, lines 38–43 in Version I correspond to lines 37–42 in Version II. Although the lines regarding the Tio and Dusu are in reverse order, in terms of the use of dyadic sets, these lines are the same. The varied evidence of these two versions of Suti Solo do Bina Bane shows the formulaic continuity in the compositional capabilities of the poet Mikael Pellondou.


1 In lines 92–93, Mikael refers to Po’o Pau Ai//Latu Kai Do where he should have referred to Fua Bafa//Lole Holu. This was a mistake that was immediately recognised. I have not altered the text, if only to emphasise that poets can make ‘mistakes’ in their compositions.


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