Previous Next

Engaging Indigenous Economy

Contributors

Jon Altman is a Research Professor at the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation at Deakin University, and an Emeritus Professor of The Australian National University located at RegNet: School of Regulation and Global Governance. From 1990 to 2010 he was foundation Director of the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research at ANU. He is an enthusiastic advocate for the power of critical and independent academic research to persuade.

PK Basu is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Business, Charles Sturt University. His research interests include Indigenous entrepreneurship. His research has been funded by the Australian Research Council (Discovery and Linkage Grants).

Shelley Bielefeld is a Braithwaite Research Fellow at RegNet: School of Regulation and Global Governance at The Australian National University where she is undertaking scholarship on the interaction between the regulatory state and Indigenous peoples in the area of welfare reform.

Geoff Buchanan is a PhD candidate at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, The Australian National University. He commenced a career in policy research as Jon Altman’s research assistant in 2004. He has worked at the Native Title Research Unit at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies and currently works with the ACT Council of Social Service.

Rose Butler is a Research Associate with the Centre for Social Impact at the University of New South Wales. She undertakes Australia-based ethnographic and qualitative research on children’s economic lives, family and economy, class and cultural diversity in education.

Jock Collins is Professor of Social Economics in the Management Discipline Group at the UTS Business School, Sydney, Australia. His research interests centre on an interdisciplinary study of immigration and cultural diversity and include immigrant and Indigenous entrepreneurship. His research has been funded by the Australian Research Council and the Rural Industry Research and Development Council.

Louise Crabtree is a Senior Research Fellow in the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University. She has recently led work funded by the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute focusing on appropriate housing tenure options for Aboriginal communities in New South Wales and the Northern Territory.

Katherine Curchin is an applied political philosopher with research interests in social policy and Indigenous policy in Australia. She is a Research Fellow in the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, The Australian National University, and holds an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award. Her current research project compares Noel Pearson and Jon Altman’s visions of Indigenous development.

Ben Dibley is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Culture and Society, Western Sydney University, Australia. He is co-author of Collecting, ordering, governing: anthropology and liberal government (Duke University Press, forthcoming).

Jacky Green is a Garawa warrior and artist from the Gulf country of the Northern Territory. He says he started painting to get his voice out: ‘I want to show people what is happening to our country and to Aboriginal people. No one is listening to us. What we want. How we want to live. What we want in the future for our children. It’s for these reasons that I started to paint. I want government to listen to Aboriginal people. I want people in the cities to know what’s happening to us and our country.’

Chris Gregory is an Adjunct Fellow in Anthropology at The Australian National University. He is an economic anthropologist who has lived and worked in Papua New Guinea, India and Fiji. He is the author of Observing the economy (Routledge, 1989, with Jon Altman). A second edition of his book, Gifts and commodities, has just been published by HAU books.

Seán Kerins is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, The Australian National University. Over the past 25 years he has worked with Indigenous peoples and local communities on cultural and natural resource management issues in Aotearoa/New Zealand, the Faroe Islands, Norway and Australia.

Emma Kowal is Professor of Anthropology in the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Deakin University. She is the author of Trapped in the gap: doing good in Indigenous Australia (Berghahn, 2015). 

Branka Krivokapic-Skoko is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Business, Charles Sturt University. Her research interests include the revitalisation of regional and rural Australia through ethnic business and immigration. Her research has been funded by the Australian Research Council and the Rural Industry Research and Development Council.

Richard Martin is a Research Fellow and Consultant Anthropologist at the University of Queensland. His research is focused on the politics of land and identity in Australia. He has undertaken numerous applied projects, including research on multiple native title claims and cultural heritage matters around Queensland. He was co-editor (with Cameo Dalley) of Dichotomous identities? Indigenous and non-Indigenous people and the intercultural in Australia, The Australian Journal of Anthropology, Volume 26, Issue 1 (2015).

Kerry McCallum is Senior Research Fellow in the News and Media Research Centre, Faculty of Arts and Design, University of Canberra. Her research in political communication examines the relationships between changing media, political participation and the development of social policy, with a particular focus on Australian Indigenous affairs. 

Pamela McGrath is currently Research Director with the National Native Title Tribunal. Her research interests include the social impacts of native title, Indigenous heritage management, information management and archiving. She has worked in the native title sector for over 15 years and in 2010 co-founded the Centre for Native Title Anthropology at The Australian National University.

Mark Morrison is Sub-Dean Research in the Faculty of Business, Charles Sturt University. His research has been funded by the Australian Research Council (Discovery and Linkage Grants), the US Environmental Protection Agency and National Science Foundation, NSW Environmental Trust, Land and Water Australia, Country Energy, IPART and the US Forest Service.

Stephen Muecke is Professor of Ethnography in the Environmental Humanities Program at the University of New South Wales. His book The Mother’s Day protest and other fictocritical essays will be published by Rowman and Littlefield International in June 2016.

John Nieuwenhuysen is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, and is currently Emeritus Professor, Monash University. In 2003 he received an award (AM) in the Order of Australia for services to independent research on immigration, multicultural, equity, indigenous, taxation, labour and industry issues, and to reform of the liquor laws of Victoria.

Nicolas Peterson is Professor of Anthropology at The Australian National University. He has a long-standing interest in Australian Aboriginal anthropology, land and sea tenure, economic anthropology, and fourth-world peoples and the state. His most recent book is Experiments in self-determination: histories of the outstation movement in Australia (coedited with Fred Myers, ANU Press, 2016).

David P Pollack is a former adviser in the Australian Government specialising in land rights, native title and royalty management. He has a special interest in the Aboriginals Benefit Account and worked closely with Jon Altman in researching the financial aspects of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 during the period of the Reeves Review in the late 1990s.

Kim de Rijke is Lecturer in Anthropology at the University of Queensland. His current research is focused on the sociocultural dimensions of unconventional gas developments in Australia, Europe and the US. For the past 13 years he has also carried out applied research on native title and Indigenous cultural heritage, and was managing and senior anthropologist at the Kimberley and Central Queensland Aboriginal Land Councils from 2003 to 2008.

Marianne Riphagen is a Visiting Fellow at the School of Archaeology and Anthropology, The Australian National University. She also teaches anthropology at the Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Her research has focused on art created by urban-based Indigenous Australians, Indigenous cosmopolitanism and the economic value of Aboriginal cultural heritage in Australia’s Western Desert.

Will Sanders joined the staff of the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR) as a Research Fellow in 1993, having previously been a CAEPR Associate and co-author with Jon Altman of CAEPR’s Discussion Paper No. 1. He works on policy issues relating to housing, local government and social security. His political science training has also led to a research interest in Indigenous people and elections. Will was Deputy Director of CAEPR from 2010 to 2014.

Benedict Scambary is an anthropologist with 20 years’ experience working with Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory. He completed his PhD at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research under the supervision of Jon Altman in 2007. He is currently the Chief Executive Officer of the Aboriginal Areas Protection Authority.

Leon Terrill is a lecturer in the University of New South Wales Law School and a Research Director at the Indigenous Law Centre. He is the author of Beyond communal and individual ownership: Indigenous land reform in Australia (Routledge, 2015) and teaches land law, contract law and Indigenous legal issues.

Annick Thomassin is an anthropology PhD candidate at McGill University (Canada). Her thesis examines the politics underpinning fisheries co-management strategies in Torres Strait. She is also a Research Officer at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, The Australian National University, where her research focus is largely on the political ecology of coastal and marine resources management.

David Trigger is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Queensland. His research interests encompass the different meanings attributed to land and nature across diverse sectors of society. He has carried out more than 35 years of anthropological study on Indigenous Australian systems of land tenure, including applied research on resource development negotiations and native title. He is the author of Whitefella comin’: Aboriginal responses to colonialism in northern Australia (CUP, 1992).

Lisa Waller is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Communication and Creative Arts, Deakin University. Her research is concerned with how news media shape society, from Indigenous Affairs policy, to their role in regional and rural identity formation and the administration of justice.

Ed Wensing is a Fellow of the Planning Institute of Australia and of the Higher Education Academy. He is currently a PhD Scholar at the National Centre for Indigenous Studies, The Australian National University, and Adjunct Associate Professor in the College of Marine and Environmental Sciences at James Cook University. He has over 40 years’ experience as an urban and regional planner and policy analyst and has worked extensively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on a wide range of land administration and land use planning matters.

Kaely Woods has had a long career as a senior bureaucrat in Indigenous affairs. She is now a PhD candidate at The Australian National University, researching the role and value of Indigenous culture in economic development, particularly in remote Australia. Her other research interests include Indigenous control, governance, and participation in enterprises and services across cultural and other industries.


Previous Next