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Public Policy: Why ethics matters

Biographies of contributors

Jonathan Boston is Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Institute of Policy Studies at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington. He has published widely in the fields of public management, tertiary education, social policy, comparative government, New Zealand politics, and climate change policy, including 24 books and over 170 journal articles and book chapters.

Andrew Bradstock is Howard Paterson Professor of Theology and Public Issues and Director of the Centre for Theology and Public Issues at the University of Otago. Previously he co-directed the Centre for Faith and Society at the Von Hügel Institute, St Edmund’s College, Cambridge, and was Secretary for Church and Society with the United Reformed Church in the United Kingdom.

David Bromell is a principal adviser with the New Zealand Ministry of Social Development, a senior associate of the Institute of Policy Studies at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington, and the author of Ethnicity, Identity and Public Policy: Critical perspectives on multiculturalism (2008) and ‘Recognition, redistribution and democratic inclusion’ (in R. Openshaw and E. Rata (eds), The Politics of Conformity in New Zealand, 2009).

John Broome is White’s Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Oxford. He was previously Professor of Philosophy at the University of St Andrews and Professor of Economics at the University of Bristol. His books include The Microeconomics of Capitalism (1984), Weighing Goods (1991), Counting the Cost of Global Warming (1992), Ethics out of Economics (1999), Weighing Lives (2004).

Tom Campbell is Director of the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, an Australian Research Council Special Research Centre, at Charles Sturt University. He was formerly Dean of Law at the Australian National University and Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of Glasgow. His books include The Left and Rights (1983), Justice (2001), and Rights (2006).

Ramon Das is a senior lecturer in philosophy at Victoria University of Wellington. He is especially interested in questions about ethics and international relations, as well as questions about what responsibilities ordinary citizens have to alleviate global suffering. His other research areas include philosophy of law, philosophy of economics, and moral psychology. He is writing a book on the ethics of globalisation.

David Eng is a consultant for the Tertiary Education Commission in New Zealand and was previously a lecturer in philosophy at Victoria University of Wellington. Before that, he was an assistant professor at California State University Bakersfield for three years. When he moved to New Zealand in 2003, he worked for the Tertiary Education Commission until 2007. His areas of research include epistemology, social epistemology, philosophy of mind, aesthetics, and philosophy of evaluation.

Howard Larsen is a principal analyst with the New Zealand Ministry for the Environment, where he has a particular interest in the effective use of science in policy development. He has earlier worked extensively in atmospheric physics research, both in New Zealand and overseas. His particular area of research was clouds, storms, and rain.

Xavier Márquez is a lecturer in political theory at Victoria University of Wellington. His research interests range from ancient political thought (especially Plato and Cicero) to more general questions about power, democracy, and expertise. He is currently writing a book about Plato’s political thought.

Julia Maskivker is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Rollins College, Florida. She holds a PhD from Columbia University. Her areas of specialisation include analytical ethical and political theory, theories of justice, theories of social citizenship, and modern political thought.

Michael Mintrom is an associate professor of political studies and coordinator of the master of public policy degree at the University of Auckland. He is a specialist in the politics of policy innovation, policy entrepreneurship, and change leadership. He is the author of Contemporary Policy Analysis, forthcoming from Oxford University Press.

David Rea is a principal adviser with the New Zealand Ministry of Social Development and a research associate of the Institute of Policy Studies at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington. Previously he was general manager of the New Zealand Ministry of Youth Development and general manager of older people’s policy in the Ministry of Social Development.

Andy Reisinger is a senior fellow with the New Zealand Climate Change Research Institute at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington. He works on a variety of issues, including climate policy as well as vulnerability and adaptation to climate change. Previously he worked for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and as a senior adviser for the New Zealand Ministry for the Environment. He is the author of Climate Change 101: An educational resource (2009).

Simon Smelt is working with the Centre for Law and Economics at the Australian National University on governance and regulation of financial institutions. Previously he has worked for the New Zealand Treasury (1986–94) on the reform of ports, Tomorrow’s Schools, labour market legislation, and capital markets. As a consultant, he worked internationally on financial management and regulatory reform.

John Uhr is Professor of Public Policy at the Crawford School of Economics and Government, Australian National University. He teaches ethics and public policy and runs the Parliamentary Studies Centre. His books include Terms of Trust: Arguments over ethics in Australian government (2005). He has published extensively on ethics and government.

Dan Weijers is a PhD student in the Philosophy Programme at Victoria University of Wellington. His masters and doctoral theses are in the field of ethics. He is particularly interested in happiness and well-being, subjects he has published and lectured on.


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