Contested Governance

Culture, power and institutions in Indigenous Australia


Table of Contents

Preliminary Pages
List of Figures
List of Tables
Notes on contributors
Abbreviations and acronyms
Foreword
Acknowledgements
1. Understanding Indigenous Australian governance
An intercultural allegory
Contesting governance
The purpose of the book
Researching governance
Conceptualising governance
Theorising governance
Conclusion
References
Part 1. The governance environment
2. Between a rock and a hard place
Background
Changing the arrangements
Development discourses and the alleged ‘failure’ of self-determination
Indigenous discourses
The Homelands debate
Mainstreaming CDEP and CHIP
The outcomes of the COAG trials
The 2007 intervention in the NT
Governance complexity and contestation
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
3. Constraints on researchers acting as change agents
Background
Making the concept of governance tangible
Research funding as a determinant of methodology
Positionality and ‘balance’
The role and power of ‘officials’
Enforcing marginalisation: what’s in a name?
Notions of good development
Acknowledgements
References
Part 2. Culture, power and the intercultural
4. Cultures of governance and the governance of culture
Introduction
The research process
Seeing governance like a state
The NT view of governance
Regionalisation in West Arnhem Land
Re-imagining Indigenous governance
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
5. Whose governance, for whose good?
Introduction
A colonial history?
The Yolngu ‘world’
Laynha as an intercultural zone
Power, accountability and value
Two contrasting conceptualisations of Laynha as an organisation
Meeting the neo-assimilationist challenge, 2005–07
Conclusion: towards a negotiated and empowering system of governance in the intercultural space
Acknowledgements
References
6. Regenerating governance on Kaanju homelands
Introduction
The Aboriginal domain, the mainstream and the intercultural field
Kaanju homelands
Kaanju outstations (1989–96)
Development of Chuulangun (late 1990s–present)
Discussion
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
Part 3. Institutions of Indigenous governance
7. Different governance for difference: the BAC
A brief regional, social and historical background
Theory, methods and caveats
A potted history of BAC’s organisational evolution
Governance challenges
Adaptively managing governance tensions
Recent external threats
Governance for difference: analytic explication
A final reflection
Acknowledgements
References
8. The business of governing: building institutional capital in an urban enterprise
Introduction
The problem with ‘community’ and ‘family’?
Community and organisational governance in Newcastle
Yarnteen—a quiet economic success
Yarnteen’s governance history
Yarnteen’s governance model
Structural flexibility and diversification
A durable governance culture
Building institutional capital
Leadership for economic development
Conclusion: the business of ‘governing for business’
Acknowledgements
References
9. Indigenous leaders and leadership
Introduction
Colonial views of Australian Indigenous leadership
Leadership in the Port Keats region
Adaptations of leadership: challenges from without
Adaptations of leadership: challenges from within
The life history of individual leadership development
A model of leadership and engagement
The ‘gap’ in intercultural understanding
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
Part 4. Contesting cultural geographies of governance
10. Noongar Nation
Introduction
Historical context
‘All one family’
Native Title Representative Bodies in Western Australia
Noongar Land Council
Native title claims in the southwest under the Noongar Land Council
The Single Noongar Claim
Family meetings and the Single Noongar Claim
Promise and problems with the Single Noongar Claim
Where to from here?
Conclusion
References
11. Regionalism that respects localism
Introduction
The emergence of ACGC
Actively promoting voluntary regionalism: the Northern Territory Government 1999–2005
ACGC around the millennium: centre/periphery tensions
Building relationships: working with Anmatjere Community Government Council 2004–06
Times of change: working with ACGC in 2007
Achievements and limitations: from Anmatjere Community Government Council to Central Desert Shire
Postscript
Acknowledgements
References
Part 5. Rebuilding governance
12. Incorporating cattle: governance and an Aboriginal pastoral enterprise
RSPCA
The Pastoral Lands Board
Office of the Registrar of Aboriginal Corporations
Support for the community
Incorporation and the community
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
13. Mapping expectations around a ‘governance review’ exercise of a West Kimberley organisation
Introduction
Kurungal Inc: a brief history
Organisation identifies need for governance review
Background to the review: the coordinator’s concerns
The community’s concerns
My observations
The consultant’s view
The review workshop
The consultant’s report
Finding practical solutions (meeting half way)
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
Key ICGP Publications